Why are some people so Intransigent?

Way back in 1976 when it was first suggested to me that I had Klinefelter’s syndrome, and I looked it up in the public library, it didn’t quite seem true. “They must have made a mistake” I thought to myself. Men with Klinefelter’s syndrome are mentally retarded, and I’m not mentally retarded. “All these years and I never knew” I thought, “Mentally retarded people walk about with their tongues hanging out their mouths, I don’t do that!” It must be something else.

I did also see the infertility bit, but that just whizzed past my eyes, why wouldn’t it? If I’m not mentally retarded I can’t be that either. That seemed logical at the time. Then there was the extra chromosome thinggy bit, the karyotype, that was what the blood test was for one of them anyway. The others were to measure LH, FSH, testosterone, estradiol & other things, nothing all that important.

So for years and years and years after that I believed I had Klinefelter’s syndrome. Yeah it must be true, I’d been told it for years and never thought about it again, my doctors said I had Klinefelter’s syndrome and they all know what they’re talking about right, they’re doctors they never tell anything but the truth, right! Of course. It was just so simple to say – well once practiced it was easy to say anyway. Do you know we all say it wrong, it’s Kline’felter there’s a distinctive pause between the ‘e’ and the ‘f’ if we were to say it properly. But that’s an aside.

Anyway, then the 1990’s came along, and for some reason I was given cause to think about Klinefelter’s syndrome again. To that point it had only been a physiological condition that I was born with. Of course I was born with it, how else did I get it? No-one had ever suggested it was possible to get it without being born with it, so I must have been born with it, a ‘no brainer’ really, right?

August 1993 a publication came out called “UNDERSTANDING KLINEFELTER SYNDROME: a guide for XXY males and their families.” That was a shocker, I had to re-think. Oh well never mind, it was only the first ever time I’ve had to consider I was not born with Klinefelter’s syndrome. Bloody American’s they always want to come up with some different take of normal everyday things right, and here is another Americanisation. They can’t even spell aluminium, they don’t even know what aluminium is, but they use it every day! Of course I wasn’t prejudiced, New Zealanders are not prejudiced. I can read an American publication and read the right English into it, even if they can’t know it or spell it. Of course I can, I am smart.

Turn to page 5 everybody. “I never refer to newborn babies as having Klinefelter’s, because they don’t have a syndrome,” Arthur Robinson (bloody American) M.D.

Eh, eh, eh what? What’s this lunatic talking about? How the hell does he get away with that, bloody ignorant fool!

Turn to page 6. “Presumably, some of them will grow up to develop the syndrome Dr. Klinefelter described, but a lot of them won’t.”

So what did Dr. Klinefelter describe? This is going to take a lot of work on my part, I’m going to have to find a reliable source of information to find out what Dr. Klinefelter actually did describe, being that I just assumed he described me, when I was 17, before I was adult, legally or otherwise. I knew what was in public library books, but I’d never actually read what he described. I tell you first what he didn’t describe. He didn’t describe 17 year old teenagers. He didn’t describe babies. He didn’t describe children.

He described fully grown MEN.

These MEN had, obviously male genitalia.
These fully grown men were hypogonadal and had/were:
Small firm testes.
Gynaecomastia.
over 6 feet tall.
Elevated LH.
Elevated FSH.
Low testosterone.
Female fat distribution.
Female pattern pubic hair.
Sparse facial hair.
Sparse axillary hair.
Azoospermia.
Obesity.

Now then when was the last time you met a new born baby with:

Small firm testes.
Gynaecomastia.
Was over 6 feet tall.
Elevated LH.
Elevated FSH.
Low testosterone.
Female fat distribution.
Female pattern pubic hair.
Sparse facial hair.
Sparse axillary hair.
Azoospermia.
Obesity.

Or a prepubertal boy with:

Small firm testes.
Gynaecomastia.
Was over 6 feet tall.
Elevated LH.
Elevated FSH.
Low testosterone.
Female fat distribution.
Female pattern pubic hair.
Sparse facial hair.
Sparse axillary hair.
Azoospermia.
Obesity.

And what did I look like when I was 17, well a few of the above, these few:

Small firm testes.
Elevated LH.
Elevated FSH.
Low testosterone.
Sparse facial hair.
Sparse axillary hair.
Azoospermia.

I accept I did have Klinefelter’s syndrome when I was 17, but not all the symptoms, just enough of them. But NONE of them were manifest until after the onset of puberty. I was not born with Klinefelter’s syndrome.

That bloody American doctor knew more than I first thought!