The Latest I can Find

For all those wallies out there, especially Australian and American wallies, who never look therefore never find, updated information, or statistical data about 47XXY/Klinefelter’s syndrome. So next time Hida Viloria wants to make an ass of herself, by repeating unverified crap from her uneducated colleagues, she can come here first and have a decent read of the latest I can find, that a lay person can easily read and understand, the exact reason why NZKA & NZSCS existed, Michael Noble:

Copyright © 2012 N´estor Pacenza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Clinical Presentation of Klinefelter’s Syndrome: Differences According to Age

The aim of the study was to establish the characteristics of presentation of 94 patients with Kinelfelter’s syndrome (KS) referred to the endocrinologist at different ages. The diagnosis of KS was more frequent in the age group between 11 and 20 years (46.8%).

Most of the patients (83.7%) showed the classic 47,XXY karyotype and 7.1% showed a 47,XXY/46,XY mosaicism. Half of the patients younger than 18 years presented mild neurodevelopmental disorders. The most frequent clinical findings were cryptorchidism in prepubertal patients, and small testes, cryptorchidism, and gynecomastia in pubertal patients.

FSH, LH, AMH, and inhibin B levels were normal in prepubertal patients and became abnormal from midpuberty. Most adults were referred for small testes, infertility, and gynecomastia; 43.6% had sexual dysfunction. Testosterone levels were low in 45%.

Mean stature was above the 50th percentile, and 62.5% had BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2. In conclusion, the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome seems to be made earlier nowadays probably because pediatricians are more aware that boys and adolescents with neuro-developmental disorders and cryptorchidism are at increased risk.

The increasing use of prenatal diagnosis has also decreased the mean age at diagnosis and allowed to get insight into the evolution of previously undiagnosed cases, which probably represent the mildest forms. In adults average height and weight are slightly higher than those in the normal population. Bone mineral density is mildly affected, more at the spine than at the femoral neck level, in less than half of cases.

Just from a brief reading, skimming through it, I see that the patients with small penis overall was about 16%, contrasting favourably with the Ratcliffe report at 23%. The more patients found and studied the the lower the percentage of those with small penis are discovered. I expect even larger studies to report a similar trend.

It’s best guys that you don’t measure your penis size on the basis of published information. I notice one particular XXY idiot made a video about a site that said effectively we all had a small penis, Milton Diamond’s rubbish. Then reported a couple of years later that same information, as if it applied to him, and was relevant to all of us.

If you don’t understand anything, print this document out from the link provided in the copyright notice, take it your doctors and say these words “What does this mean?” I’ve used this process many times myself and it works a treat!

I can find plenty of information here to complain about, but don’t do that, sift out the good stuff. The first good stuff is, this report exists. Then there’s, you can copy it for free. Then you can repeat confidently – “Ongoing research continues into XXY / Klinefelter’s syndrome to improve our understanding.”

And all those above mentioned wallies can shut the f**k up!

Good day.